In the middle of the night

Sometimes in the blackness of the night, when sleep won't help you, the job fills ones head. Not always pleasantly as we anticipate the day to come.

'In the middle of the night'

In the middle of the night, I’m awake in bed, Loads of things spinning round my head.

In the middle of the night, I toss and turn, Too many things I still need to learn.

In the middle of the night, It’s becoming hell, My new job is great but I need to do well.

In the middle of the night I’m awake in my bed, And tomorrow’s first meeting fills me with dread.

(pef, 2015)

This poem is narrated by Lorraine Ansell, a British female voiceover professional.

More people are writing and thinking about work based poetry. Does this poem make you think of anything? Send your thoughts to editor@workinwords.net

Please do send a poem you’ve written or one you like and we’ll share it with other WorkInWord readers.

It's easy to join our team of readers. Check out this video to see how.

Image: The brightly glowing plumes seen in this image are reminiscent of an underwater scene, with turquoise-tinted currents and nebulous strands reaching out into the surroundings. However, this is no ocean. This image actually shows part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small nearby galaxy that orbits our galaxy, the Milky Way, and appears as a blurred blob in our skies. The NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Hubble Space Telescope has peeked many times into this galaxy, releasing stunning images of the whirling clouds of gas and sparkling stars (opo9944a, heic1301, potw1408a). This image shows part of the Tarantula Nebula's outskirts. This famously beautiful nebula, located within the LMC, is a frequent target for Hubble (heic1206, heic1402). In most images of the LMC the color is completely different to that seen here. This is because, in this new image, a different set of filters was used. The customary R filter, which selects the red light, was replaced by a filter letting through the near-infrared light. In traditional images, the hydrogen gas appears pink because it shines most brightly in the red. Here however, other less prominent emission lines dominate in the blue and green filters. This data is part of the Archival Pure Parallel Project (APPP), a project that gathered together and processed over 1,000 images taken using Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, obtained in parallel with other Hubble instruments. Much of the data in the project could be used to study a wide range of astronomical topics, including gravitational lensing and cosmic shear, exploring distant star-forming galaxies, supplementing observations in other wavelength ranges with optical data, and examining star populations from stellar heavyweights all the way down to solar-mass stars.

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble; NASA: acknowledgement: Josh Barrington Text: European Space Agency

WorkInWords

Work dominates our lives. WorkInWords.net offers you a place to read and listen to what people think and feel about the work they do. Please send us yours with this link or email: editor@workinwords.net.

 

Our key words are: Read | Listen | Experience |

Work | Feelings | Experiences | Attitudes | Behaviour

© by WorkInWords

Proudly created with Wix.com

  • LinkedIn
  • Black SoundCloud Icon
  • Black Facebook Icon
  • Twitter
  • YouTube
  • Black Instagram Icon